Moving Agile Forward

Rethinking What’s Next in Software Development

Al Shalloway is an acknowledged thought leader in how we design and develop software. In this post, he begins the conversation about where we are headed next. It seems that everyone is in software development these days and most agree that we need to improve. Al notes that the original manifesto mentions the Agile Manifesto mentions “the team 17 times, the customer 3 times, business twice and management not at all.” But rather than impaling the sacred Agile Manifesto cow, he offers us a place to start the conversation with his personal manifesto.

I think this is a wonderful place to start a conversation about where we go from here. If you have an opinion about how the software business needs to change, I encourage you to read this post.

bh 5/30/2017

A Personal Manifesto | Net Objectives

May 28, 2017 — Posted by Al Shalloway

Background and the Agile Manifesto.I have been asked several times to help in the rewrite of an Agile Manifesto.  After having been involved in Snowbird 10 (the reunion of some of the original Agile Manifesto authors along with some others from the Lean/Kanban community) I realized there is no “Agile” community. Rather we have many sub-communities that are so diverse it is hard to think of them as being under one umbrella.
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Source: A Personal Manifesto | Net Objectives blog

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The Sherpa Shuffle — David Marquet

Another outstanding insights from David Marquet! Many of us are up to our ears in corporate cultural issues. I love this idea of linking the Sherpa Shuffle to change in an organization!
Thanks again David!
bh 2016/09/13


Leadership Nudge™ – SHERPA SHUFFLE This summer I spent a week hiking in the Swiss Alps. I had a full seven days to hike, think, learn, admire, and reflect, among other things. In my Leadership Nudge™ this week I want to share one of the things I learned and how it applies to changing your culture.…

via The Sherpa Shuffle — David Marquet

Communicating Change… ick

Change is hard, but communicating changes just stinks. This is a good piece about ways to communicate change using video. Have you used video to communicate change?
bh 8/15/2016


Three ways to use video to communicate change

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Use video to communicate change, connect with audiences, and create a unified change story

We get it. Change is hard.

According to research, one of the main reasons change efforts fail in business is the lack of effective communication. If there’s anything that employees and clients dislike more than uncertainty, it’s silence.

Video is the richest, most engaging communication medium. It’s the opposite of silence. So when inevitable changes occur, video can help you cut through the perceived silence with powerful, nuanced communication.

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Here are three ways you can leverage video to communicate change.

1. Live broadcasts 

Deliver short live interviews with employees or clients – use these events to address changes and the impact of new regulations, merger and acquisitions, staff changes, etc.

For example, there is a lot of uncertainty regarding post-Brexit vote outcomes in the UK and EU. Legal services and financial firms – and others – are leveraging video to reach their customers promptly to help them navigate Brexit. Live streaming video is a great way to interact with your employees and customers in real time. It keeps your organization agile and helps you reach targeted audiences across regions.

Make it personal  video brings the human side of the organization into change initiatives.

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The Danger of Comparison (from Launchpoint)

My daughter has a reminder from Theodore Roosevelt posted on her refrigerator:

Comparison is the thief of joy.

As I look back on my life, my unhappiest memories involve me comparing myself to others and anxiousness about where I “should” be. When I focus on where I am and try to improve from there, I am much happier and much more successful.

This is a great post and worth your time.


 

The Danger of Comparison

August 10, 2016 – by .wpb_animate_when_almost_visible { opacity: 1; }

.wpb_animate_when_almost_visible { opacity: 1; }</style&We’ve all watched the Olympic swimming rivalry play out between the USA’s Michael Phelps and South Africa’s Chad le Clos. The not-so-subtle jabs in the media between the two have spanned continents, from the London games all the way to Rio, and are credited with Phelps’s return to the sport from retirement.

phelps+faceFor those of you who haven’t been salivating over this story, le Clos narrowly beat Phelps in the 200 meter butterfly race during the London games and giving Phelps his first international loss. Phelps announced his retirement shortly after, with this one blemish on his nearly spotless competitive record. He watched le Clos dominate in the 200 meter fly race in international competition and eventually announced his return to the event stating the other swimmers really “are not that fast,” clearly taking a jab at his rival. That statement has unleashed a slew of back-and-forth comments from both parties in the news and on social media.

And since arriving in Rio, le Clos has been trying to psyche Phelps out, most notably while shadowboxing in front of Phelps as they wait for a qualifying race, launching a thousand memes featuring Phelps’s hilarious scowl.

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Leadership is Always Responsible, How to “Turn Your Ship Around”

Leadership Is Always Responsible

Much of my career relates in one way or another to adult learning. During that time, I learned that no amount of training can overcome poor leadership.

This article from Fast Company is a great overview of the power of leadership language
http://www.fastcompany.com/1843334/submarine-captain-power-leadership-language

If you are interested in this book, the link below is from the Lean Thinker’s Bookshelf.
http://astore.amazon.com/theleathi-20/detail/1591847532


Bob Hubbard
Lean Six Sigma Black Belt
AT&T
Technology Development
P: 770.982.5898
bh3762@att.com
Send #X before you drive to pause the conversation until you arrive.
Take the pledge…
It Can Wait.

 

Agile Programming for Your Family? Bruce Feiler says Yes!

I became an advocate for continuous improvement when I discovered that when we improve processes, we also improve people’s lives. Bruce Feiler’s TED Talk on agile families is well worth your time. I regret that I did not use these techniques when my daughters were younger, but I can certainly spread the message, starting NOW!
bh 2014/10/17

Bruce Feiler has a radical idea: To deal with the stress of modern family life, go agile. Inspired by agile software programming, Feiler introduces family practices which encourage flexibility, bottom-up idea flow, constant feedback and accountability. One surprising feature: Kids pick their own punishments.

Bruce Feiler: Agile programming — for your family 

Bruce Feiler, Writer
Bruce Feiler is the author of “The Secrets of Happy Families,” and the writer/presenter of the PBS miniseries “Walking the Bible.” Full bio

Two Kinds of Happiness (One Is Bad for You) | LinkedIn

Deepak Chopra's wisdom seems to know no bounds.  
This is a great way to start your week!

bh

Two Kinds of Happiness (One Is Bad for You)

Oct 3 2014

Deepak Chopra MD (official) post from 10/3/2014

The field of positive psychology took a step forward with a new finding about happiness and our genes. In the past, genes were considered to be stable and fixed in how they affect the body, but now that the human genome has been mapped, this view has radically changed. The chemical activity of genes, known as genetic expression, is altered by many factors. It’s highly likely that genes are so fluid, in fact, that genetic expression changes according to a person’s thoughts, feelings, and moods. If that’s true, then saying something as basic as “I’m happy” could need genetic verification. Words are just words, but your genetic-expression profile is a fact.

This was underlined by the first ever study of genes and happiness. Researchers from UCLA and the University of North Carolina discovered that the genetic link to happiness cuts two ways. People who are happy because they have a sense of purpose and meaning in their lives showed positive gene expression in their immune cells, especially as it affected inflammation and antiviral response. This kind of happiness was labeled “eudaimonic well-being,” from the Greek word for happiness, eudaimon. By contrast, people whose happiness depends on consumerism and bursts of pleasure actually fared worse than unhappy people in the genetic expression of their immune cells, showing a tendency toward inflammation and decreased ability to fight viruses. This kind of happiness was labeled “hedonic well-being” from the Greek for pleasure, hedone.

via Two Kinds of Happiness (One Is Bad for You) | LinkedIn.

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