Read This! Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?

Cover of "Linchpin: Are You Indispensable...
Cover of Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?


Seth Godin is the 21st century marketer. In his previous book Purple Cow Seth declared: “Everyone’s a Marketer Now!” In All Marketers Are Liars, he tells us that “Everyone’s a Storyteller Now!” And finally in Tribes; he aserts that, “Everyone’s a Leader Now!”.

In Linchpin: Are You Indispensable? , he makes us look inside ourselves. He defines a linchpin as somebody in an organization who is indispensable, who cannot be replaced—whose role is too unique and valuable. (No surprises so far.) Then he goes on to say that you need to be one of these people, you really do. To not be one is economic and career suicide. (Here again, this is not a surprise.)

Then he drops the bombshell… he says that to be a linchpin, you have to be an artist at work. An artist? That really took me back. He’s not talking about wearing a beret and moving to Paris, he’s talking about having a passion for your work, caring about your craft and delivering work that matters. (He emphasizes ‘delivering’ citing a Steve Job quote targeted at a software engineer that could never deliver his code. )

Enough of the rambling book review. I highly recommend this book. (So much so, that I may actually BUY it.) I know… crazy huh!

Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?

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Must Read: Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell

Outliers (book)

As a Six Sigma Black Belt and a Lean practitioner, it is my job to use data, charts, maps, and any other method needed to persuade people. My colleagues and I use statistics daily, and we use these numbers to make our case for change. Malcolm Gladwell’s Outliers, is about statistics. But Gladwell uses stats to challenge our world view. We tend to think that Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and The Beatles succeeded because they were somehow specially gifted and lucky. Outliers uses data to demonstrate that it takes at least 10,000 hours of practice to become superior at a task. We must be ‘smart enough’ to do the work of a astrophysicist, but if you are smart enough to do that, the next most important success criteria is how hard you work… and I think that’s pretty cool.
 
Bob H    

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A single marble is in the center, while a group of marbles is at the top.Outliers: The Story of Success is a non-fiction book written by Malcolm Gladwell and published by Little, Brown and Company on November 18, 2008. In Outliers, Gladwell examines the factors that contribute to high levels of success. To support his thesis, he examines the causes of why the majority of Canadian ice hockey players are born in the first few months of the calendar year, how Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates achieved his extreme wealth, and how two people with exceptional intelligence, Christopher Langan and J. Robert Oppenheimer, end up with such vastly different fortunes. Throughout the publication, Gladwell repeatedly mentions the “10,000-Hour Rule”, claiming that the key to success in any field is, to a large extent, a matter of practicing a specific task for a total of around 10,000 hours.

The publication debuted at number one on the bestseller lists for The New York Times and The Globe and Mail, holding the position on the former for eleven consecutive weeks. Generally well received by critics, Outliers was considered more personal than Gladwell’s other works, and some reviews commented on how much Outliers felt like an autobiography. Reviews praised the connection that Gladwell draws between his own background and the rest of the publication to conclude the book. Reviewers also appreciated the questions posed by Outliers, finding it important to determine how much individual potential is ignored by society. However, the lessons learned were considered anticlimactic and dispiriting. The writing style, deemed easy to understand, was criticized for oversimplifying complex sociological phenomena.

Synopsis

Outliers has two parts: “Part One: Opportunity” contains five chapters, and “Part Two: Legacy” has four. The book also contains an Introduction and Epilogue. Focusing on outliers, defined by Gladwell as people who do not fit into our normal understanding of achievement, Outliers deals with exceptional people, especially those who are smart, rich, and successful, and those who operate at the extreme outer edge of what is statistically possible. The book offers examples that include the musical ensemble The Beatles, Microsoft’s co-founder Bill Gates, and the theoretical physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer. In the introduction, Gladwell lays out the purpose of Outliers: “It’s not enough to ask what successful people are like. […] It is only by asking where they are from that we can unravel the logic behind who succeeds and who doesn’t.” Throughout the publication, he discusses how family, culture, and friendship each play a role in an individual’s success, and he constantly asks whether successful people deserve the praise that we give them.

The book begins with Gladwell’s research on why a disproportionate number of elite Canadian hockey players are born in the first few months of the calendar year. The answer, he points out, is that since youth hockey leagues determine eligibility by calendar year, children born on January 1 play in the same league as those born on December 31 in the same year. Because children born earlier in the year are bigger and maturer than their younger competitors, they are often identified as better athletes, leading to extra coaching and a higher likelihood of being selected for elite hockey leagues. This phenomenon in which “the rich get richer and the poor get poorer” is dubbed “accumulative advantage” by Gladwell, while sociologist Robert K. Merton calls it “the Matthew Effect“, named after a biblical verse in the Gospel of Matthew: “For unto everyone that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance. But from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath.” Outliers asserts that success depends on the idiosyncrasies of the selection process used to identify talent just as much as it does on the athletes’ natural abilities.

A man speaks into a microphone.

In Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell interviews Bill Gates and focuses on the opportunities given to him throughout his lifetime that have led to his success.

A common theme that appears throughout Outliers is the “10,000-Hour Rule”, based on a study by Anders Ericsson. Gladwell claims that greatness requires enormous time, using the source of The Beatles’ musical talents and Gates’ computer savvy as examples. The Beatles performed live in Hamburg, Germany over 1,200 times from 1960 to 1964, amassing more than 10,000 hours of playing time, therefore meeting the 10,000-Hour Rule. Gladwell asserts that all of the time The Beatles spent performing shaped their talent, “so by the time they returned to England from Hamburg, Germany, ‘they sounded like no one else. It was the making of them.'” Gates met the 10,000-Hour Rule when he gained access to a high school computer in 1968 at the age of 13, and spent 10,000 hours programming on it.

In Outliers, Gladwell interviews Gates, who says that unique access to a computer at a time when they were not commonplace helped him succeed. Without that access, Gladwell states that Gates would still be “a highly intelligent, driven, charming person and a successful professional”, but that he might not be worth US$50 billion. Gladwell explains that reaching the 10,000-Hour Rule, which he considers the key to success in any field, is simply a matter of practicing a specific task that can be accomplished with 20 hours of work a week for 10 years. He also notes that he himself took exactly 10 years to meet the 10,000-Hour Rule, during his brief tenure at The American Spectator and his more recent job at The Washington Post.

A photo of a man in a suit

Gladwell argues that Oppenheimer’s affluent background helped give him the skills necessary to become successful.

Outliers notes
Image by Alastair McDermott via Flickr

Reemphasizing his theme, Gladwell continuously reminds the reader that genius is not the only or even the most important thing when determining a person’s success. Using an anecdote to illustrate his claim, he discusses the story of Christopher Langan, a man who ended up working on a horse farm in rural Missouri despite having an IQ of 195 (Einstein’s was 150).[2] Gladwell points out that Langan has not reached a high level of success because of the environment he grew up in. With no one in Langan’s life and nothing in his background to help him take advantage of his exceptional gifts, he had to find success by himself. “No one—not rock stars, not professional athletes, not software billionaires, and not even geniuses—ever makes it alone,” writes Gladwell.

Later, Gladwell compares Langan with Oppenheimer, the father of the atomic bomb. Noting that they typify innate natural abilities that should have helped them both succeed in life, Gladwell argues that Oppenheimer’s upbringing made a pivotal difference in his life. Oppenheimer grew up in one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in Manhattan, was the son of a successful businessman and painter, attended the Ethical Culture Fieldston School on Central Park West, and was afforded a childhood of concerted cultivation. Outliers argues that these opportunities gave Oppenheimer the chance to develop the practical intelligence necessary for success. Gladwell then provides an anecdote: When Oppenheimer was a student at University of Cambridge, he made an unsuccessful attempt to poison one of his tutors. When he was about to be expelled from the school, he was able to compromise with the school’s administrators to allow him to continue his studies at the university, using skills that he gained during his cultivated upbringing.

Before the book concludes, Gladwell writes about the unique roots of his Jamaican mother, Joyce, a descendant of African slaves. Joyce attended University College in London, where she met and fell in love with Graham Gladwell, a young mathematician. After moving together to Canada, Graham became a math professor and Joyce a writer and therapist. While Gladwell acknowledges his mother’s ambition and intelligence, he also points out opportunities offered to his parents that helped them live a life better than those of other slave descendants in the West Indies. Gladwell also explains that, in the 18th century, a white plantation owner in Jamaica bought a female slave and made her his mistress. This act inadvertently saved the slave and her offspring from a life of brutal servitude. As one of the slave’s descendants, this turn of luck led to Gladwell’s relatively successful position in life. Summarizing the publication, Gladwell notes that success “is not exceptional or mysterious. It is grounded in a web of advantages and inheritances, some deserved, some not, some earned, some just plain lucky,” and at the end of the book, he remarks, “Outliers wasn’t intended as autobiography. But you could read it as an extended apology for my success.”

Outliers
Author Malcolm Gladwell
Cover artist Allison J. Warner
Country United States
Language English
Genre(s) Psychology, sociology
Publisher Little, Brown and Company
Publication date November 18, 2008
Media type Hardback, audiobook
Pages 304
ISBN 9780316017923
OCLC Number 225870354
Dewey Decimal 302 22
LC Classification BF637.S8 G533 2008