Communicating Change… ick

Change is hard, but communicating changes just stinks. This is a good piece about ways to communicate change using video. Have you used video to communicate change?
bh 8/15/2016


Three ways to use video to communicate change

Quote

Use video to communicate change, connect with audiences, and create a unified change story

We get it. Change is hard.

According to research, one of the main reasons change efforts fail in business is the lack of effective communication. If there’s anything that employees and clients dislike more than uncertainty, it’s silence.

Video is the richest, most engaging communication medium. It’s the opposite of silence. So when inevitable changes occur, video can help you cut through the perceived silence with powerful, nuanced communication.

1

Here are three ways you can leverage video to communicate change.

1. Live broadcasts 

Deliver short live interviews with employees or clients – use these events to address changes and the impact of new regulations, merger and acquisitions, staff changes, etc.

For example, there is a lot of uncertainty regarding post-Brexit vote outcomes in the UK and EU. Legal services and financial firms – and others – are leveraging video to reach their customers promptly to help them navigate Brexit. Live streaming video is a great way to interact with your employees and customers in real time. It keeps your organization agile and helps you reach targeted audiences across regions.

Make it personal  video brings the human side of the organization into change initiatives.

Continue reading “Communicating Change… ick”

The Danger of Comparison (from Launchpoint)

My daughter has a reminder from Theodore Roosevelt posted on her refrigerator:

Comparison is the thief of joy.

As I look back on my life, my unhappiest memories involve me comparing myself to others and anxiousness about where I “should” be. When I focus on where I am and try to improve from there, I am much happier and much more successful.

This is a great post and worth your time.


 

The Danger of Comparison

August 10, 2016 – by .wpb_animate_when_almost_visible { opacity: 1; }

.wpb_animate_when_almost_visible { opacity: 1; }</style&We’ve all watched the Olympic swimming rivalry play out between the USA’s Michael Phelps and South Africa’s Chad le Clos. The not-so-subtle jabs in the media between the two have spanned continents, from the London games all the way to Rio, and are credited with Phelps’s return to the sport from retirement.

phelps+faceFor those of you who haven’t been salivating over this story, le Clos narrowly beat Phelps in the 200 meter butterfly race during the London games and giving Phelps his first international loss. Phelps announced his retirement shortly after, with this one blemish on his nearly spotless competitive record. He watched le Clos dominate in the 200 meter fly race in international competition and eventually announced his return to the event stating the other swimmers really “are not that fast,” clearly taking a jab at his rival. That statement has unleashed a slew of back-and-forth comments from both parties in the news and on social media.

And since arriving in Rio, le Clos has been trying to psyche Phelps out, most notably while shadowboxing in front of Phelps as they wait for a qualifying race, launching a thousand memes featuring Phelps’s hilarious scowl.

Continue reading “The Danger of Comparison (from Launchpoint)”

Leading through Transformation

EGM-TO-Candid-1New Opportunity! I am privileged to have begun working with our new team members from DirecTV as Team Lead for the Entertainment Group & Mobility (EGM) Tech Dev Transformation Office. We are responsible for organizational change management, leadership development,  monitoring and reporting of progress, and supporting leadership communication for the EGM Tech Dev organization.

In the picture above, I’m taping the latest edition of our TO: You video segments, where we communicate information tailored specifically to address the needs of our new DTV colleagues.

The folks in El Segundo have been incredibly hospitable and I will be spending a great deal of time in California this summer.

Bob Hubbard
Team Lead
Entertainment Group & Mobility –Transformation Office
M: 770.317.1841 / SfB: 470-277-6853

bh3762@att.com
Twitter: @BobHubbardATL

Doctors Bash “Taylorism” and “Toyota Lean” in the New England Journal of Medicine | Lean Blog

This is another great piece from Mark Graban on lean healthcare. In this post, Mark addresses critical comments made in the New England Journal of Medicine. These negative quotes reminded me of similar attitudes reflected in Atul Guwande’s book, The Checklist Manifesto. Dr. Guwande shows how using simple checklists greatly improve surgical outcomes. For me, the most interesting part of the book, related to how resistant doctors were to the concept that they did not know everything. We see this regularly in business. Senior leaders shun standard work (like checklists) because they are deemed too rudimentary.

bh


Mark writes:

It’s not credible to say Lean is inappropriate or that Lean doesn’t work. That said, there are many wrongheaded things done in the name of “Lean,” when people don’t understand the mindset and philosophy behind Lean.

Read the entire post here: Doctors Bash “Taylorism” and “Toyota Lean” in the New England Journal of Medicine | Lean Blog

Helping the Planes Run on Time: Interview with Air France’s Transformation Program Director

Helping the Planes Run on Time

This interview with Air France’s Transformation Program Director is an interesting read from Process Excellence Network contributor:  Marie-Helene Morvan.
Posted:  03/22/2016  12:00:00 AM EDT. 

Air France has a long history supporting the quality movement. I had the opportunity to represent Delta Air Lines’ In-Flight Service at the Air France’s Quality Expo in the late 1990’s. As the leader of Continuous Improvement Team XL, we talked with Air France employees about how we were improving quality in our Flight Attendant Learning & Development programs.

Link to the interview: http://www.processexcellencenetwork.com/business-transformation/articles/helping-the-planes-run-on-time-interview-with-air/

 

The best job in America has a median salary of over $116,000

This is great article from Samantha Cooney  at Mashable.com on 20 January 2016. Data analysis has never been more popular and this post gives an overview of what jobs are hot!

bh 2016/03/22

The best job in America comes with a handsome six figure salary — and has plenty of job openings.

The job: Data scientist.

It came out on top of job search site Glassdoor’s its annual list of the Best Jobs in America, which was released late on Tuesday night. The survey ranked the careers by a job score between 1 and 5 (with 5 being the best) based on earning potential, career opportunities, and the number of job openings in that field.

Link to the entire article is below:

http://mashable.com/2016/01/20/the-best-jobs-in-america-2016/?utm_cid=mash-com-fb-main-link#C5tNoAlHlkqf

Troubling the Customer: Why is Buying Blue Jeans So Hard?

Why do we tolerate inconvenience?

Stack of blue jeans taken by the author
Lots of choices, but only a few will fit.

Being born in the 50’s, I spent most of my working life wearing a business uniform to work. My uniform included lace-up dress shoes, over-the-calf wool blend socks, leather belt, boxers/briefs and tee shirt, dress suit (jacket and trousers), and if it was raining, I carried/wore a Burberry-type overcoat and a wool scarf. For men in business, men wore suits and ties, and women wore dresses, or skirts and blazers. Blue jeans were for working in the yard or in the garage.

Saying that things have changed is the ultimate understatement. Blue jeans are  acceptable at work. Not only are they acceptable, a friend of mine at a huge IT company told me they the senior manager were specifically asked NOT to wear anything but blue jeans. In my wildest imagination, I could have never have imagined this eventuality.

Bottom line… I have to buy jeans on a fairly regular basis.

Why do I have to look through 347 pairs of jeans to find the 4 pair in the store that are my size? I must riffle through stacks upon stacks of jeans because it is more convenient for the store to display clothes based on their style, not their size.

I predict that some retailer will figure this out. They will increase their displays and they will minimize the stacks and stacks of inventory displayed on the floor. But for now, I will continue to move around hundreds of pairs of blue jeans to find the half dozen pair of jeans that I will try on.

bh 2016-01-29


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 514 other followers

%d bloggers like this: